Our success

The highest summits of Australia and the Pacific Islands, which together form the continent Oceania, lie in New Guinea. New Guinea may look like an insignificant speck on the map, but it is in fact the second largest island on earth. It’s highest, snow-capped peak is the Carstensz Pyramid, which was discovered by the Dutch explorer Jan Carstensz in the 17th century.

The Carstensz Pyramid (in Indonesian “Puncak Jaya”, which means peak of glory), with its height of 4,884 m, is the highest mountain of Oceania. This makes it not only the highest mountain between the Himalayas and the Andes, but also one of the famous “Seven Summits”, the highest mountains on each of the seven continents. The first ascent was accomplished on February 13 in 1962 via the north face by Heinrich Harrer, Philip Temple, Russel Kippax and Albert Huizenga, who were assisted by 100 carriers. Although Puncak Jaya is one of the lowest of the seven summits, from a technical viewpoint, it is among the most difficult ones to ascent. The climbing difficulty, up to grade V, is much higher than the climbing difficulty at Everest or Denali (Mt. McKinley). On the other hand, we don’t encounter the same high altitudes and extreme temperatures which make Denali and Everest still a greater challenge. What’s exceptional about this journey is the 5-day trekking through the lush jungle and wet marshland. There are many steep, slippery slopes to climb, often in persistent rain. Around the summit, clouds start gathering early in the afternoon. Clear days with view onto the faraway Arafura lake are rare. The famous Colijn Expedition had to retreat due to thick fog, snowstorms and thunder. At the Grasberg mine, which was discovered in 1936 by Dozy during the Colijn expedition, the yearly rainfall is 4,000-5,000 mm. The mine is both the largest gold mine in the world and the copper mine with the lowest mining costs. It is also at the same time the source of wealth and the source of extensive damage to the environment of West-Papua and Indonesia. Choosing to summit the Carstensz Pyramide means that you will enter another world and another time – a truly exotic expedition!

 

Day-1

Arrivel Indonesia - Denapasar Bali

Meet Our guide in the airport, and transfer to the hotel; check in hotel  and meeting while dinner.
2

Fly to Papua - Timika

in the hotel 11’00am check out, drop to the airport (domestic flight). at 01.00am bording with Garuda indonesia flying to denpasar, at 06.45 arrival in Timika. check in hotel, preparation gear check. over night in the hotel (3 start hotel).
3

Fly to Sugapa Capital of Intan jaya ragancy

After breakfast in the hotel, at 7.30 drop to the airport waiting until the crew aircraft call for bording. charter flight with small airplan flying to sugapa (45 meanits flying). arrival in Sugapa-bilogai airstrip, from airstrip by motorcycle 15 minutes drive to suanggama (last village). Overnight in the Tent
4

Trekking from Suanggama - Camp I Dibasiga Camp

From Suanggama, the last village, we’ll descend down to the river. More or less following the course of the river, we are at times high above it, at times very close to it. We’ll pass a house (Salt Factory) at a small bridge, from where on we’ll continue for another 2 hours to our camp site in the middle of the jungle. Chances for rain are very high, after all, we are in the deepest rainforest. Thus, good preparation and planning at Suanggama are very important. Ascent: 970 m/ descent: 660 m; distance: 15.50 km; hiking time: 6-8 hrs.
5

Trekking from Camp I/Dibasiga camp to Camp II/Endasiga Camp

This will be the most strenuous of all our trekking days! Our path still leads through the rainforest, sometimes over, sometimes under the large rootes, around mud parches, then again straight through the next one – a proper jungle! Swinging through it on vines might be less exhausting… After the Salt Factory camp, our path first ascends steeply, the goes up, down and steeply up again, until we reach a small camp (Blind’s camp). Though it may seem as if the Indisaga camp were closeby as well, that’s sadly not true! We’ll be climbing through the steep rainforest for another 2-3 hours. At 3200m, just shortly before our camp, the rainforest suddenly ends. A large clearing follows, which is where we’ll set up our camp. Ascent: 1115 m/ descent: 275 m; distance: 17.00 km; hiking time: 8-10 hrs.
6

Trekking from camp II to camp III

 The first hour of our trek will lead through light, open forest to the next plane and finally up to the ridge, which separates the first valley from “our” valley, where part of our route will lead through. Following the ridge for 2-3 hours, we’ll reach our penultimate camp after a short descent. Ascent: 760m/ descent: 420m; distance: 11.01km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.
7

Trekking from camp III to camp IV

We’ll descend into the beautiful valley. The wild landscape here will take us back millions of years, to a time when ancient beasts roamed the vast forests… Reaching the riverbank, we’ll cross the river on a natural stone bridge. On top of the next ridge, we’ll meet up with the other route option (via Illaga). We’ll wade through swampland and shortly reach the last camp before base camp and the New Zealand pass. Ascent: 780m/ descent: 630m; distance: 13.00km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.
8

Trekking from camp IV to Camp V (basecamp Lake vallay 4300m)

The most difficult part of this section is the New Zealand pass (you could use the plural form here, since it is actually several passes following each other). There’s a 50 metre long climbing passage which may be quite difficult on a rainy day. Once we’ll have mastered it, we’ll descend to the base camp at the foot of the Carstensz Pyramid. Ascent: 920m/ descent: 350m; distance: 8.64km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.
9-10

Climbing to the Top of Carstensz Pyramid - Summit day

 Starting early in the morning, we set off to our destination: the Carstensz Pyramid. We’ll cross a small pass to reach the entrance point to the highest mountain of Oceania. Straight from the beginning, we’ll hook our jumars into the fixed rope – and off we go! We’ll have to be alert from the very start, for there are many loose rocks lying around; kicking one of them off can have severe consequences. Given that rain and snowfall can occur towards midday, the exact programme of the day will be set on site. Summiting the Carstensz Pyramid via the West Ridge (UIAA III-IV) requires confident climbing skills and endurance. Story of the Route to the top Of Carstensz Pyramid: The route of the first ascent (original route from 1962) follows the path of least resistance via the right part of the North Face. Cracks and slabs alternating with scree lead to the first ridge. Once at the sandy foot of the rock face, a steep slab (75°) has to be mastered, which leads to a slightly flatter stretch with occasional short upswings. About halfway up, a scree basin follows, which leads through scree-filled gullies to the West Ridge, whose difficulty is graded III to IV on the UIAA scale, though large parts of it are easier. At the West Ridge, you follow the obvious line at the right side to the top of the ridge. The next section of the ridge shows several splits and gaps. The first and largest gap is crossed hanging from a fixed rope – a technique which, though it needs some getting used to, is very efficient and quick. What follows is the “Yellow Tower,” which can be passed over easy terrain on the right side. The next small gap isn’t too difficult to pass, provided you’ve got some flexibility and manage to cross it with a large spread step. After another short stretch on the wide ridge, you have to cross another gap, this time descending slightly and crossing a large chockstone to then, stepping wide, reach the other side. The upcoming gendarme is first climbed via a slab on the right side but then passed on the left side. Now, the summit is almost in reach; the terrain is getting easier and flatter, though there is a bit more scree. If you’re lucky enough to reach the summit before the daily rain showers, an amazing view down, reaching from the glacier remains to the 4000 metres lower rain forests, awaits you, while straight across, the glaciated summit of the Ngga Pulu is visible. The descent follows soon: Speed is key here, for the rain washes scree in and out of the gutters, and the small water falls combined with almost sub-zero temperature can quickly lead to hypothermia. Following the known route, the descent to base camp happens in a combination of climbing down and abseiling.
11-14

Trekking Back From Basecamp to Sugapa

 We will take the same way as on the walk in. Knowing it already, we should be quicker on the journey back so that we can save one day.
15

Flight from Sugapa–Nabire or Timika–Denpasar

 Today, we’ll fly via Nabire back to Bali. We’ll be brought to our hotel, where we can relax, drinking a toast to our hard but wonderful travel. Overnight stay at a hotel
16

Planning a spare day is most important so that we have the capacity to compensate for unforeseeable events

17

We'll enjoy a few last hours in Bali in the morning before leaving for the airport in the late afternoon.

18-19

Reserved day for bad weather etc

INCLUDED on the expedition cost:

*    All required permits in Jakarta and Papua

*    Airport transfers in Bali and Timika or Nabire

*    Accommodation based on twin share in Bali (1 night per arrival/before         leaving to Timika/Nabire) & at Timika or Nabire

*    Domestic flights (Bali or Jakarta to Timika or Nabire -return)

*    Chartered flight Timika – Sugapa

*    Meals as per the itinerary (B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner)

*    Camping gears (sharing dome tent, kitchen equipment, dining tent, serving       table, chairs)

*    Experienced mountain guide, cook & field asisstant

*    Satellite Phone for group daily report

*    Fixed rope on Carstensz Pyramid wall

*    Camping, dining, and cooking equipment (incl. cutlery)

*    Porters up to 17kgs per client

EXCLUDED:

*    Insurances

*    Overweight on all flights

*    Airport tax (total for 6 domestic flights return = USD 20/person (have to be paid in Rupiah)

*    Personal climbing and camping equipments

*    Extra food and beverages

*    Personal expenses (laundry, phone call, hotel’s minibar)

*    Evacuation or rescue cost (but we provide helicopter for emergency)

*    Any expenses due to the flight delay or cancel

*    Indonesia Re-entry Visa USD 35/pax – VISA ON ARRIVA

Trekking route via sugapa village, district – intan jaya
The following description below

carstensz track

Day 1 : Timika – Sugapa/Suanggama

Charter flight with small airplan flying to sugapa (45 meanits flying from Timika). arrival in Sugapa-bilogai airstrip, from airstrip by motorcycle 15 minutes drive to suanggama (last village). Overnight in the Tent

Day 2 :  Suanggama – Camp I/Dibasiga

From Suanggama the last village, we’ll descend down to the river more or less following the course of the river  we are at times high above it at times very close to it. We’ll pass a house (Salt Factory) at a small bridge from where on we’ll continue for another 2 hours to our camp site in the middle of the jungle. Chances for rain are very high after all we are in the deepest rain forest. Thus, good preparation and planning at Suanggama are very important. Ascent: 970 m/ descent: 660 m; distance: 15.50 km; hiking time: 6-8 hrs.

Day 3 ; Camp I/Dibasiga (2380m) – Camp II Endasiga Camp (3230m)

This will be the most strenuous of all our trekking days! Our path still leads through the rainforest, sometimes over, sometimes under the large rootes, around mud parches, then again straight through the next one – a proper jungle! Swinging through it on vines might be less exhausting… After the Salt Factory camp, our path first ascends steeply, the goes up, down and steeply up again, until we reach a small camp (Blind’s camp). Though it may seem as if the Indisaga camp were closeby as well, that’s sadly not true! We’ll be climbing through the steep rainforest for another 2-3 hours. At 3200m, just shortly before our camp, the rainforest suddenly ends. A large clearing follows, which is where we’ll set up our camp. Ascent: 1115 m/ descent: 275 m; distance: 17.00 km; hiking time: 8-10 hrs.

Day 4 (four) ; Camp II/ Endasiga Camp (3230m) – Camp III/ Ebay Camp (3584m)
The first hour of our trek will lead through light, open forest to the next plane and finally up to the ridge, which separates the first valley from “our” valley, where part of our route will lead through. Following the ridge for 2-3 hours, we’ll reach our penultimate camp after a short descent. Ascent: 760m/ descent: 420m; distance: 11.01km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.

Day 5 ; Camp III/Ebay Camp – Camp IV/Nasidome Camp(3734m)
We’ll descend into the beautiful valley. The wild landscape here will take us back millions of years, to a time when ancient beasts roamed the vast forests… Reaching the riverbank, we’ll cross the river on a natural stone bridge. On top of the next ridge, we’ll meet up with the other route option (via Illaga). We’ll wade through swampland and shortly reach the last camp before base camp and the New Zealand pass. Ascent: 780m/ descent: 630m; distance: 13.00km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.

Day 6; Camp IV/Nasidome Camp(3734m) – Base Camp Lakes Valley(4330m)
The most difficult part of this section is the New Zealand pass (you could use the plural form here, since it is actually several passes following each other). There’s a 50 metre long climbing passage which may be quite difficult on a rainy day. Once we’ll have mastered it, we’ll descend to the base camp at the foot of the Carstensz Pyramid. Ascent: 920m/ descent: 350m; distance: 8.64km; hiking time: 6-7 hrs.

Day 7: Summit day – Climbing to the Top of Carstensz Pyramid

Starting early in the morning, we set off to our destination: the Carstensz Pyramid. We’ll cross a small pass to reach the entrance point to the highest mountain of Oceania. Straight from the beginning, we’ll hook our jumars into the fixed rope – and off we go! We’ll have to be alert from the very start, for there are many loose rocks lying around; kicking one of them off can have severe consequences. Given that rain and snowfall can occur towards midday, the exact programme of the day will be set on site. Summiting the Carstensz Pyramid via the West Ridge (UIAA III-IV) requires confident climbing skills and endurance. Story of the Route to the top Of Carstensz Pyramid: The route of the first ascent (original route from 1962) follows the path of least resistance via the right part of the North Face. Cracks and slabs alternating with scree lead to the first ridge. Once at the sandy foot of the rock face, a steep slab (75°) has to be mastered, which leads to a slightly flatter stretch with occasional short upswings. About halfway up, a scree basin follows, which leads through scree-filled gullies to the West Ridge, whose difficulty is graded III to IV on the UIAA scale, though large parts of it are easier. At the West Ridge, you follow the obvious line at the right side to the top of the ridge. The next section of the ridge shows several splits and gaps. The first and largest gap is crossed hanging from a fixed rope – a technique which, though it needs some getting used to, is very efficient and quick. What follows is the “Yellow Tower,” which can be passed over easy terrain on the right side. The next small gap isn’t too difficult to pass, provided you’ve got some flexibility and manage to cross it with a large spread step. After another short stretch on the wide ridge, you have to cross another gap, this time descending slightly and crossing a large chockstone to then, stepping wide, reach the other side. The upcoming gendarme is first climbed via a slab on the right side but then passed on the left side. Now, the summit is almost in reach; the terrain is getting easier and flatter, though there is a bit more scree. If you’re lucky enough to reach the summit before the daily rain showers, an amazing view down, reaching from the glacier remains to the 4000 metres lower rain forests, awaits you, while straight across, the glaciated summit of the Ngga Pulu is visible. The descent follows soon: Speed is key here, for the rain washes scree in and out of the gutters, and the small water falls combined with almost sub-zero temperature can quickly lead to hypothermia. Following the known route, the descent to base camp happens in a combination of climbing down and abseiling.

To return takes 4 days with the same track